Learn Some Fashion Ideas

You can purchase branded clothes and shoes, but you cannot buy fashion sense. If you do not follow fashion ideas, you might start looking old fashioned. To follow the latest fashion trends and be part of the modern fashion world, you must know the latest styles and trends in your city and the fashion industry. Women love their shoes and clothes and it is hard to look good without the right combination of both.

Shoes are one of the most important fashion products. My younger sister spends a lot of her money on fashionable shoes and accessories. She doesn’t mind spending 80% of her salary on fashion. Every fashionable woman wants to keep abreast of the latest fashion trend. If you do not purchase the right shoes that are in vogue, it might end up being a waste of money.

After reading this, you might think to yourself “Yes, I would like to know the hottest fashion in town”. You have come to the right place, if you love fashion then this is a must read for you.

1. Read fashion magazines – If you never used to read fashion magazines, you need to start now. There are a lot of fashion magazines where you can learn fashion trends at the book stalls, these include Vogue, Lucky, Elle, Harper Bazaar, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan amongst others.

2. Blogs- There is tens of thousands of fashion blogs on the internet. You can read blogs and the blog comments to get more fashion ideas.

3. Online stores and websites- There are online shops and websites that provide information on latest fashion trends including shoes.

4. TVs and films – When you watch television and movies, you get a lot of information on the latest fashion trends. Actors and actresses wear designer outfits and shoes to impress viewers. Designers also promote their brands through various channels and movies.

5. Experiment – You too can experiment with your outfits and shoes. This is 100% legal and nobody can stop you from doing this.

6. Fashion shows – Top brands such as UGG boots, Gabor shoes and similar brands organize fashion shows exclusively to display their new and latest range of fashion products. You can learn a lot from these shows.

7. Brand advertisement – If you drive by the nearest malls or shopping complex, you are bound to see big billboards or banners advertising brands such as Moda in Pelle shoes, UGG boots, Lulu Guinness etc. You can get information on latest fashion ideas and trends from these advertisements.

8. Fashion from different continents – You can follow shoe fashion trends of various continents and countries such as India, Japan, Pakistan, Lebanon etc.

9. Other ladies’ fashion – You can go to the market or shopping malls to see what type of shoes other ladies are wearing on different outfits. You can adopt their styles to suit yours; this is one of the best ways to determine the right fashion for you.

The whole world is looking at your fashion sense. Be fashionable and bold, learn new fashion ideas and impress the people around you.

What Causes Leg Swelling?

Leg inflammation or leg edema is a frequent medical malady. The main reason of leg inflammation should be discovered and healed. It should not be pushed aside nor be dealt with liquid pills except if the cause has been identified. There are six biggest causes of leg swelling.

The major source of leg swelling is chronic venous insufficiency. Vein disease or vein disorders happen twice as often as coronary artery disease, three times more frequently than peripheral arterial disease, or PAD, and almost five times more widespread than congestive heart failure.

Vein disease has six names:

  • Venous stasis
  • Varicose veins
  • Chronic venous insufficiency
  • Venous hypertension
  • Venous reflux disease

Lymphedema
In this health issue the veins in the legs suffer a loss of their power to transfer the used blood back up and out of the legs to the heart, lungs, liver, and kidneys to be filtered, replenished with essential nutrients and oxygen, and transported back out to the body. When this occurs, high pressure occurs in your leg veins. This high pressure results in discharging of fluid and other blood components into the leg outside of the blood vessels. When the veins are not able to effectively deliver the blood out of the legs with each heart beat, your heart pumps blood into your legs under increased and higher pressures. This can cause a generalized engorgement of the veins in your legs and accompanying this will come added leakage.

In addition, the blood in your legs ends up being rather toxic since it has not been cleaned by your kidneys. The quantity of oxygen in the blood lowers below normal. The nutrition is used up, and the waste from your legs gather in the uncirculated blood in your legs. This builds a generalized harmful state in your legs. This “toxic” blood makes your legs ill and creates inflammation. All these things result in swelling.
Swelling from veins is best early in the day and worse during the night time. When you lay down at night the blood finally comes back out of your legs and it is then filtered by your kidneys, nutrients is replenished by your intestines, your lungs add oxygen, your liver processes the blood, and your heart is able to pump the good healthy blood back out to the legs which are no longer engorged, the pressure in the legs is back to normal, and the blood is now good and healthy. By the morning your legs ought to seem at their very best and the cycle will begin again once you stand up and gravity alongside damaged venous circulation hinders the blood from returning again.

Congestive Heart Failure
The second most frequent reason for swelling to the legs is congestive heart failure. Over the years, before vein disease was understood very well, congestive heart failure was felt to be the reason behind all leg swelling until it can be medically backed differently, thus multiple patients with leg swelling some time ago and even now will take several different cardiac assessments to eliminate heart failure as a root cause. Definitely venous disease is considered the most common underlying cause and most people have a normal cardiac workup.

In the patients with congestive heart failure, the common signs or symptoms is generally difficulty of breathing. While resting many have difficulty of breathing on exertion and when they lie down flat. This is known as orthopnea and it frequently results in these people having to rest with their head elevated because once they lay totally horizontal it allows significant breathing difficulties.

Congestive heart failure is largely a consequence of one or both of two underlying health disorders; these are coronary artery disease or clots in the arteries and undiagnosed or untreated high arterial blood pressure or “hypertension”.

Kidney Failure
The third most frequent reason for leg swelling or leg edema is kidney failure. Progressed kidney failure will hinder the body’s ability to clear itself of surplus fluid resulting in fluid retention and leg swelling. It can also be correlated with undiagnosed arterial hypertension which is much more widespread in persons with diabetes.

Liver Failure
The fourth major cause of leg edema or leg swelling is liver failure. This could be a little bit more tricky, but when the liver is not operating very well the required protein in your bloodstream drops to dangerously low levels which then may cause leakage of fluid out of the vascular system and into the tissue, resulting in swelling in your legs or even abdomen. Most of these patients frequently have considerable swelling in their abdomen as well.

Thyroids
The fifth common root cause of leg edema is low thyroid or hypothyroidism. This is known as pretibial myxedema. This is also a little complicated, but once your thyroid hormones decline to an unhealthy level and is still there for a considerable amount of time your overall rate of metabolism declines very low and this contributes to swelling in your legs.

Lymphedema
Lastly, Lymphedema is where vessels often called lymphatics get damaged or blocked for many reasons, contributing to the incapability of your body to clear fluids from your legs. Many times this is as a result of lasting neglected venous insufficiency, but can even be resulting from trauma, operation, and much less likely cancer.

Regardless of the underlying cause, leg swelling is never natural, and a reason needs to be determined and dealt with accordingly. To identify the trigger of swelling in your legs, call Dr. Morgan in Houston at the Lone Star Vein Center. We specialize in treating vein disease using non-invasive and painless procedures such as VNUS Closure to return the health of your legs. Schedule an appointment and contact (281) 292-0121 to find out more.

Machine Embroidery on Jackets

Of all the different wearable items that can be embroidered, jackets would appear to be the easiest. When most of think of jackets in terms of embroidery, large areas for full back and left chest designs come to mind. What many of us often forget are the little curveballs apparel manufacturers are adding into their designs such as box pleats and seams down the back. Fashion forward styles may have things like raglan sleeves which can throw off design placement since they lack the guideline of a shoulder seam.

One sure way to begin with a jacket that is fit for embroidery is to focus on working with styles that give the fewest headaches. Therefore, do some research on the newest trends. In addition, start with a machine that is in top notch condition, with fresh needles and bobbins. Below are the other basic elements to consider in your quest for trouble-free jacket embroidery.

Choosing a hoop

The best choice in hoops for jackets is the double-high hoop. This hoop is taller than the average hoop so offers more holding power. You can wrap your hoop with white floral tape, medical gauze, twill tape or bias tape to prevent hoop marks and help give a snug fit. Tissue paper, backing or waxed paper can also be used. Hoop these materials on top of the jacket, then cut a window for the embroidery. A thin layer of foam under the tape can also help. But avoid masking tape as it tends to be sticky and leaves a residue on jacket and hoop. When choosing your hoops, remember that oval hoops hold better all the way around than do square hoops with oval corners. The “square oval” holds better in the corners than on the sides, top and bottom.

Needles

The size and type of needle will depend on the fabric of the jacket. Leather jackets call for an 80/12 sharp. (Wedge shaped “leather” needles tend to do more harm than good.) Use this same sharp needle on poplin and other cotton-type jackets. Use a 70/10 or 80/12 light ballpoint on nylon windbreakers and a 75/11 fine ballpoint on satins and oxford nylons to avoid runs in the fabric. Heavy wool jackets, canvas and denim jackets require a stronger sharp needle. Corduroy stitches well with either ballpoint or sharp. Remember that ballpoint needles nudge the fabric out of the way in order to place the stitch, while sharps cut through the fabric. A good rule of thumb is to use the same size needle to embroider as you would to sew the seams of the jacket in assembly.

As for thread, polyester is a good choice for embroidery on jackets that will be exposed to the weather and coastal climates. Be sure to include washing and dry cleaning instructions with your finished product. Consider choosing a large-eye needle when working with metallic and other heavy specialty threads

Placing the design

Hold a straight-edge across the jacket back from side seam to side seam at the bottom of the sleeves. Mark a horizontal straight line, then double check this with a measurement from the bottom of the jacket to the same line. Jackets are not always sewn together straight. Measure the straight line and divide in half to find the center of the jacket. Place a vertical line through the horizontal line at this point. The intersection of the two lines will be the center. If you are rotating the design to sew upside-down or sideways, take this into consideration when measuring and later when hooping. Use tailor’s chalk, disappearing ink pens or soap to mark your garments. Avoid using pins. Masking tape is available in thin strips at graphic and art stores. It is easy to remove and leaves no marks. Wider masking tape, though, can leave residue.

Centering the design eight inches down from the back of the collar is a good place to start, and should work with most jackets. Small sizes may do better at six inches; very large ones may end up at 10 inches. The top of the design should fall about 2 ½ inches down from the collar of the jacket. But remember that this will change if the jacket has a hood. Then it will be necessary to place the design below the hood.

The best way to determine the center point of the design is to have someone try the jacket on, or invest in a mannequin. Pin an outline of the design or a sew-out to the back, making sure to include lettering and graphics to determine size and placement. Left or right chest designs should be centered three to four inches from the edge of the jacket and six to eight down from where the collar and the jacket body intersect. When embroidering on jackets with snaps or buttons, use the second snap or button as a guide.

Be careful not to place the design too close to the sleeve side of the jacket. Designs are not to be centered on the left chest. The correct placement is closer to the placket than to the sleeve. The center of a sleeve design should fall three to four inches below the shoulder seam of the sleeve. When placing a design on the sleeve of a raglan style jacket, mark the placement using a live model or a mannequin.
Backings

The complexity of a design will often be the major factor when choosing a backing for embroidery. Stitch intensive designs may need the extra stability backing provides. Even jackets made of fabrics such as poplin and satin (that might not otherwise cry out for a backing) can benefit from its use, especially if the design is complex. Consider attaching the backing to the jacket with spray adhesive before hooping to increase stability. Attaching a piece of light cut-away backing-or even rear-away-to a satin jacket can hold the jacket better while stitching, allowing for good registration in your design. And, if you should need to remove stitching, the presence of a backing can make your job easier and safer. Backing can also prevent residue from coated canvas fabrics from raining down into the bobbin housing.

Most jacket materials do not require topping. The exception to this might be the corduroy or fleece jacket where the use of a topping can tame the fluff of the fleece and prevent stitches from falling into the valleys of the corduroy. The use of underlay does a better job than topping for challenging fabrics-and as an added benefit, it does not wash away.

Hooping technique

When hooping, especially large or bulky items, start from the “fixed” side of the thumbscrew and travel around the hoop to the “free end.” Use the heels of your hands to alleviate stress on your fingers and wrists. When hooping flat on a table, make sure that there is nothing between the hoop and the table. If any adjustment is needed, hold as much of the upper hoop in place as you can while adjusting. This prevents the garment from popping out of the hoop.

Always make sure the jacket lining is smooth, and double check to determine that the outer shell and the lining are even. Turning the sleeves inside out can help with hooping a lined jacket.

Hooping too loosely can cause puckering, too tightly can cause fabric burn. It can also stretch the fabric causing it to “spring back” when unhooped, meaning more puckering. Tips to prevent puckering include lightening the tension upper and lower, using tear-away if lettering is fill, using mid-weight cutaway if lettering or design is satin stitch. Adjust the hoops before hooping the garment and do not pull or stretch the fabric after it is hooped. Puckering is a risk when stitching on satin, and the lighter the weight of the satin, the more the danger of puckers. You will have the best results when the hold is firm. If you can move the satin around in the hoop, it will move while stitching.

A light pressing or steaming of the area to be embroidered can improve results and ensure that lining and jacket are lined up correctly. While you are checking to make sure your bobbins are full, it is a good idea to check that no part of the jacket is doubled up under the hoop. And please make sure you are not sewing pockets shut, especially inner ones.

Hooping the jacket upside-down and reversing the design is a good way to keep the bulk of the jacket away from the needles. Make sure the arms of the jacket are out of the way of any stitching before you begin. Use clothespins, bulldog clips, quilting clips or even large hair clips. Make sure that you support the weight of the jacket during embroidery to prevent the fabric from slipping out of the hoop, and to help ensure good registration. Embroidering jackets on the tabletop instead of in the tubular mode can help prevent the weight of the jacket from hampering the job. Check also to make sure the material is flat against the throat plate. If you can push down the fabric, the presser foot will too, and this can cause flagging. Flagging can cause stitching problems and poor registration.